John H. Borden 2000 Founders Award Recipient

Dr. John H. Borden was awarded the 2000 Western Forest Insect Work Conference (WFIWC) Founders' Award.

Professor John Borden began his career with Simon Fraser University (SFU) as an assistant professor in 1966, and was appointed full professor in 1975. Since 1981 he has served as Director of the Chemical Ecology Research Group. Borden also has served as NSERC Industrial Research Chair since 1991.

John Borden has been an extraordinarily productive scientist. He has published over 300 technical papers in refereed journals since 1965. His research program has focused on semiochemicals -- elucidating their roles in bark beetle and ambrosia beetle ecology, devising management tactics and strategies using semiochemicals, etc. His expertise is widely recognized, as he has given over 80 invited presentations and seminars.

Professor Borden has also served as Senior Supervisor for over 29 Ph.D. students and 75 M.S. and M.P.M. students who have completed their degrees. He also has a superlative teaching record at SFU, where he has taught courses on Entomology; Research Design, Techniques, and Reporting; Forest Pest Management; Insect Chemical Ecology; and other topics.

Soon after John Borden joined the faculty at SFU, he was nominated for the Canadian Entomological Societies' C. Gordon Hewitt Award for superior research accomplishment for scientists less than 40 years of age. Winning this award set the stage for his many future awards that have recognized his contributions to entomology, forestry, and agriculture. His most significant achievements have resulted from his highly productive collaborations with chemists in the identification of behavior-modifying chemicals from a great number of pestiferous insects. His role in pursuing the very difficult and challenging applied research to successfully integrate this new and safer technology into our crop production systems is Professor Borden's hallmark in these innovative programs. From the perspective of the WFIWC, the behavioral chemical treatments developed by Borden and his colleagues for the mountain pine beetle and the striped ambrosia beetle are especially noteworthy.

Professor Borden's role as mentor to an extraordinary number of graduate students may be his lasting and most notable contribution to forest entomology. The student-professor relationship produces the new knowledge and skills for the next generation, and thus Professor Borden has helped create an unusually diverse and abundant intellectual resource for solving future entomological problems in agriculture and forestry -- not only in North America, but in other regions of the world as well.

Adapted from the Founders Award nomination packet by Kathy Sheehan, April 2004.